Having a flight unexpectedly cancelled can really be a nightmare especially if you have somewhere to be – like work!  But when you travel a lot these things are bound to happen.  Sometimes it’s outside the airline’s control, like when it snows, but there are also times when flights get cancelled because of aircraft maintenance.  That is what happened to me when I was supposed to fly back to NYC from London after the Christmas holidays.  Well what could have been a nightmare ended up not being so bad thanks to the EU flight compensation rules.

United planes through a rainy window. Unfortunately you cannot get compensation if the cause is weather. - "EU Flight Compensation Rules Simplified" - Two Traveling Texans

United planes through a rainy window. Unfortunately you cannot get compensation if the cause is weather.

EC Regulation 261 covers compensation for both cancellations and delays but it is complicated and the airlines don’t make it easy.  Some airlines try to offer miles in lieu of monetary compensation and if you accept it you can no longer make a claim.  Unfortunately, many passengers never get the compensation that is rightfully theirs because they don’t understand the EU flight compensation rules.  Please don’t let that happen to you.     If you have had a flight cancellation or significant delay in the last six years, you may still be able to claim the compensation.

Disclosure: I am not a legal expert, I am just passing along my experience in order to help readers better understand the EU flight compensation rules for cancellations.  If you are not sure how this applies to your specific situation, I would encourage you to speak to a lawyer.

The Flight Cancellation Story   

My lovely Christmas trip to England was coming to a close. I had booked a flight leaving Heathrow at 4pm, so we planned to have a relaxed morning before heading to London.  Unfortunately, things didn’t go as planned.

Christmas Day is always quiet in England. Here is a shot of one of the main streets in Halesworth. - "EU Flight Compensation Rules Simplified" - Two Traveling Texans

Christmas Day is always quiet in England. Here is a shot of one of the main streets in Halesworth.

Russell accidentally forgot to turn off his alarm so it went off at 6 am. Out of habit, I checked my phone.  I immediately panicked when I saw a text message from United saying my flight had been canceled due to aircraft maintenance and I was rebooked on a flight at noon that had a layover in Washington DC.

Russell lives in Saxmundham, a small town in Suffolk northeast of London. I normally take the train to Heathrow. It can take 3 1/2 hours. But this was a bank holiday so who knew how often the trains would be running.

To make matters worse, I hadn’t packed. I wasn’t ready to head back home.  I had no choice, I had to get to Heathrow as quickly as possible. Russell, the sweetheart that he is, offered to drive me. So I took a quick shower and threw my stuff into my suitcase and we headed out. Yes I did forget stuff but that was the least of my worries!

Luckily the roads were empty and we made good time.  I headed straight to the customer service desk and explained the situation.  Luckily, I was able to get another direct flight home so that I could be back at work the next day.  However, I basically lost the last day of my trip.  I felt a little better when I learned I would be eligible for compensation under EC Regulation 261.

EU Flight Compensation Rules

Lucky for me you do not have to be an EU citizen to be entitled to compensation.  The rules cover both cancellations and delays over 3 hours, if the cause is within the airline’s control.  Extraordinary circumstances like extreme weather conditions, political unrest, and employee strikes are not covered.

"EU Flight Compensation Rules Simplified" - Two Traveling Texans

All passengers on all flights originating from the EU are eligible.  The EU flight compensation rules also apply to flights arriving in the EU if it is on an EU carrier.  If you are notified of the cancellation more than 14 days before the flight or the cancellation is due to the extraordinary circumstances, you will not be eligible for compensation.  The length of the flight and whether or not it is within the EU only affect the amount of the compensation.  The compensation ranges from €125 to €600.  You can also be compensated for meals and hotel costs during the time you are delayed.

Claiming My EU Cancelled Flight Compensation

I was instructed to make my claim for compensation on the United website.  I searched and could not find a page that addressed this, so I decided I would call and ask.  The agent told me to submit the details in the general feedback form.  I completed the online form and waited.

After I didn’t hear anything back, I decided to call.  They told me that my ticket was a code share and I needed to claim my compensation through Austrian Airlines, so I tried that.  A few days later I received a call from Austrian Airlines and telling me that it was a United Flight and I needed to talk to them.

Ok, this had come full circle.  I took another look at my reservation and noticed that my outbound flight (from NY to London) was a code share, but my return flight was not.  I called up United again and worked with the agent to make sure I had the correct ticket number and completed the form.

About a week later I got an email from United telling me they would be mailing me a check.  It would take 7-10 days, but I was excited to be getting the compensation finally!  I wish we had the same protections in the US.

Have you had a flight significantly delayed or canceled from the EU? Did you claim your compensation?

Anisa

Expert Tips for Getting EU Flight Compensation:

  • Know when you are due compensation from the airlines under the EU flight compensation rules (EC Regulation 261).  Use this decision tree above to help understand if you have a claim for flight cancellations.  If you have further questions about your circumstances, please contact a lawyer.
  • Different rules apply in the US, you don’t get compensation for flight cancellations in the most cases.  However, you can get compensation if you are involuntarily bumped from a flight.  Read more about Katherine’s experience with oversold flights.

The Weekly Postcard

We are happy to co-host the Weekly Postcard Linkup.  Everyone is invited to join us and share their travel blog posts here beginning at 12 p.m. (PST) / 8 p.m. (GMT) Friday March 24th.  If you would like a reminder email, you can sign up to get one here.

For those of you that have not done a linkup before, please check out the frequently asked questions about the Weekly Postcard that we put together.  Feel free to reach out to us if you have other questions.  You can also check out last week’s posts here. Happy Travels!

Two Traveling Texans


Learn about EU flight compensation rules and how even non-EU citizens can take advantage to get money for cancellations and delays.